GAPS Friendly Ketchup Recipe

Sharing is caring!

Making your own homemade low-carb, Paleo, Whole30, and GAPS diet-friendly Ketchup at home is much easier than you might think!

Making your own homemade low-carb, Paleo, Whole30, and GAPS diet-friendly Ketchup at home is much easier than you might think!

How to make a GAPS friendly ketchup recipe

When you transition your eating from the Standard American Diet (SAD Diet) to the GAPS diet one of the first things you realize in checking intendants is that many of your condiments will need to be homemade to avoid nasty ingredients. 

Making your own homemade low-carb, Paleo, Whole30, and GAPS diet-friendly Ketchup at home is much easier than you might think!

Pin it for later

Making your own homemade low-carb, Paleo, Whole30, and GAPS diet-friendly Ketchup at home is much easier than you might think!

This post contains affiliate links, which means I make a small commission at no extra cost to you. Get my full disclosure here

GAPS-friendly ketchup nutrition 

When I first began researching foods that were allowed on the GAPs diet to heal my family’s bodies, I was shocked that you could make your ketchup. It is true! I assumed that once I signed up to eat healthier, delicious sauces like ketchup were off the table. Turns out I could not have been farther from the truth. 

This recipe is a lacto fermented ketchup that is perfect for any meal and can be made with a few ingredients already in your pantry. 

GAPS friendly low carb homemade ketchup sugar-free recipe

I love this homemade ketchup recipe so much! Not only does it taste amazing, but it encourages my kids to enjoy their entire meal.

  • This recipe is a homemade low-carb, Paleo, Whole30, and GAPS diet-friendly Ketchup
  • Storing this recipe for a few days on the counter will help ferment the ingredients together and add in more gut-friendly probiotics
  • The probiotic liquid that you use for this recipe can be from another meal. I like to use the whey from kefir or brine leftover from fermented vegetables
  • Honey is optional for this recipe, but I have found that it adds that sweetness that you would find in store-bought ketchup
  1. When you are storing any leftover ketchup, keep it in an airtight container in the fridge for up to three months. This is after leaving it at room temperature for 48 hours to allow the condiment to ferment. 
  2. Whenever I make a large batch of ketchup that I know won’t be able to be consumed in a few months, I like to freeze any leftover ketchup. Store it in an airtight container in the freezer for up to 6 months. 

How to make GAPS friendly sugar-free ketchup 

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. Add probiotic liquid to tomato paste and stir to incorporate
  2. Add the rest of the ingredients and blend thoroughly
  3. Store in a glass jar and leave at room temperature for 2 days to enhance probiotic benefits 

What makes this GAPS friendly ketchup recipe different than other Ketchup? 

I love this homemade ketchup with no sugar for so many reasons. 

For one, store-bought ketchup has so many additives that I like to avoid serving to my family whether we are on the GAPs diet or not, like excessive sugar and high fructose corn syrup. For another, the extra probiotics are just icing on the cake for any meal that I am serving. Whether it is fries and burgers, meatloaf, or anything else that ketchup compliments, I love to know that I am adding more gut-healthy choices to our meals. 

Why GAPS friendly ketchup does not use traditional ketchup ingredients

The GAPS diet is a diet that I am passionate about for so many reasons. It has significantly made my and my family’s lives better by focusing on food to heal our bodies.

I am so passionate about the GAPs diet! Most of the meals that I serve and post about on this website are inspired by this diet to help others live their healthiest lives as well through the GAPs diet. 

Even something as simple as ketchup can be a tool to help our bodies work properly when the right ingredients are added – like the ones listed in this recipe for homemade ketchup. 

True, you can serve store-bought ketchup to your family, but the amount of sugar added to the bottle is something that I try to avoid. Plus, this recipe is so easy that I think making your ketchup just makes more sense. 

More healthy recipes 

Paleo mayonnaise

Dill dressing

Fermented cranberries

Crisp probiotic pickles

Have you ever made your own ketchup before? 

How did it turn out? Share in the comments!

Join our traditional wisdom community, and grab a free GAPS diet getting started guide eBook when you subscribe!

GAPS diet getting started guide

Shop this post

 

Apple cider vinegar

Paste organic in a glass jar

Ground cloves

Allspice

Salt

Cayenne 

Honey 

Want to shop for organic handmade skincare products?

Check out the Bumblebee Apothecary Shop here.

Looking for a GAPS Intro meal plan?

GAPS to Go is a 30 day meal plan for the GAPS introduction diet that tells you what to eat each day, with complete cooking instructions, and guidance on when to move to each intro diet stage.

Check out GAPS to Go here.

GAPS to Go Meal Plan for the GAPS Diet

Follow along with Bumblebee Apothecary

YouTube

Instagram

Pinterest

Facebook

Thanks for stopping by! Be well! 🐝

If you make this recipe and love it, please give it 5 stars! Also, tag me on Instagram @bumblebeeapothecary

Yield: 1 pint

GAPS Friendly Ketchup Recipe

Making your own homemade low-carb, Paleo, Whole30, and GAPS diet-friendly Ketchup at home is much easier than you might think!

Making your own homemade low-carb, Paleo, Whole30, and GAPS diet-friendly Ketchup at home is much easier than you might think!

Prep Time 5 minutes
Additional Time 2 days
Total Time 2 days 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 tbs raw apple cider vinegar
  • 12-14 oz tomato paste organic in a glass jar
  • 1/3 cup of probiotic liquid (brine from fermented vegetables or whey from homemade kefir that you have strained out)
  • ⅛ tsp ground cloves
  • ⅛ tsp allspice
  • ½ tsp salt
  • Cayenne to taste
  • 3 tbsp honey (optional)

Instructions

  1. Add probiotic liquid to tomato paste and stir to incorporate
  2. Add the rest of the ingredients and blend thoroughly
  3. Store in a glass jar and leave at room temperature for 2 days to enhance probiotic benefits

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

16

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 257Total Fat: 1gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 1gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 249mgCarbohydrates: 60gFiber: 12gSugar: 40gProtein: 13g
GAPS™ and Gut and Psychology Syndrome™ are the trademark and copyright of Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride.

The information in this blog post is my personal experience and opinion. It is for general information purposes only, that may not apply to you as an individual, and is not a substitute for your own physician’s medical care or advice. Always seek advice from your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding nutrition, medical conditions, and advice. Never disregard medical advice or delay seeking medical care because of something you have read on this blog.

Leave a Comment

Skip to Recipe