How to Make Tallow Balm | Ultimate Skin Healing Moisturizer

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What looks like birthday cake frosting, and is packed with nutrients that skin loves? Let’s learn how to make tallow balm!

How to make tallow balm Bumblebee Apothecary whipped tallow balm buy tallow balm

Whipped or solid, tallow balm is a skin healing miracle you won’t want to be without. It might seem kind of strange at first to use something like beef fat on your skin. The truth is, using tallow for a skin moisturizer is a practice that is thousands of years old. It’s truly a traditional skincare product that has been loved for centuries.

What makes tallow so amazing? Grass fed tallow contains a unique myriad of nutrients that heal, soothe, and moisturize skin. Let’s take a look. Grass fed tallow:

  • Is deeply nourishing and moisturizing
  • Contains Vitamins A, D, K, & E, & B12, all of which are extremely beneficial for skin
  • Also helps to prevent skin’s loss of moisture
  • Contains conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) with natural anti-inflammatory properties
  • Has all of these nutrients that are found together only in animal products
  • Contains oleic acid (omega 9) aids other components in penetrating deeply into skin
  • Is antibacterial & antimicrobial
  • Contains palmitic acid which helps improve the protective barrier function of skin
  • Is rich in minerals
  • Contains stearic acid which helps to repair damaged skin, and improves skin’s flexibility and suppleness
  • Aids in skin regeneration for skin that appears healthier and more youthful
  • Contains palmitoleic acid (omega 7) which is one of our skin’s basic building blocks

What can tallow balm do?

After you’ve learned how to make tallow balm, you’ll have an extremely healing home remedy right at your fingertips. Grass fed tallow balm is so versatile.

Have dry skin? Nothing works better to moisturize! Eczema bothering you? Tallow balm calms and soothes and can even clear eczema up completely.

Struggling with acne? The unique nutrient blend and antimicrobial properties of tallow soothe and heal even deep, cystic acne.

Diaper rash? Tallow balm heals rashes in record time. Too much sun? Tallow balm to the rescue. Tallow balm is even amazing as an anti-aging face cream.

How to make tallow balm organic tallow balm 100% grass fed tallow balm DIY

A perfect baby balm

When it comes to my babies, I’ve always been extra conscious of what I put on their skin. You can’t beat tallow balm for purity, gentleness, and awesome skin soothing properties. It works great for newborn skin creases and general moisturizing. Diaper rash heals very quickly with tallow balm. It’s a perfect all around skin treatment for a variety of baby needs.

The tallow balm ingredients

Tallow from cows eating only grass has the highest amount of skin loving nutrients. When looking for beef fat to make tallow balm, look for fat from 100% grass fed beef. You can render the tallow from beef fat yourself, or use already rendered tallow.

By itself, tallow at room temperature is rather stiff and hard to use on skin. Mixing a very small amount of a liquid oil, like olive oil, helps to make it more easily spreadable.

Tallow Balm and Essential Oils

As incredible as tallow balm is on its own, it can be even more amazing when you add certain essential oils. The possibilities are really endless. You can go with single oils, or blends, depending on what you want to use the tallow balm for. Lavender is one of my favorite essential oils for its beautiful scent and the many things it can do for skin.

For soothing eczema or healing diaper rash, a blend of Lavender, Copaiba Oleoresin, Palmarosa, Lemon, Frankincense carteri, and Helichrysum italicum will work wonders. If you want an anti-aging tallow balm for your face, a blend of  Lavender, Frankincense Serrata, Lemon, Petitgrain, Coriander, Turmeric, and Rose Absolute works beautifully. Many other essential oils can be used, depending on what you want your tallow balm to smell like.

What dilution to use

For general, daily, adult use, an essential oil dilution of 1 % is best. That’s what I go with when I make my tallow balm. For babies, I tend to avoid essential oils in most cases. However, if I need to help something like diaper rash heal, I will do a very gentle dilution. 0.25% is usually a good dilution for babies. I also make very sure to only use baby safe essential oils for those times.

How to make tallow balm whipped or solid buy tallow balm 100% grass fed tallow balm

Whipped or solid?

You can make tallow balm in a solid form, or you can whip it. The solid form lasts the longest, since no air incorporated. The whipped form is the easiest to use, since it is light and fluffy, a lot like whipped cream. The whipped form is my personal favorite. Get my tallow lotion bar recipe here

This post contains affiliate links, which means I make a small commission at no extra cost to you. Get my full disclosure here.

How to Make Tallow Balm Instructions

Ingredients:

Directions:

  1. Melt tallow over gentle heat until it is liquid.
  2. Remove tallow from heat. Add olive oil and stir to combine.
  3. Add essential oils and stir again.
  4. For solid tallow balm, pour balm into glass jar. Allow to harden in the refrigerator. When solid, let balm come to room temperature before using.
  5. For whipped tallow balm, pour liquid balm mixture into a large mixing bowl. Allow to solidify at room temperature. When solid, whip with a hand or stand mixer until light and fluffy. Store in glass jar.
  6. Store both forms of tallow balm at room temperature.

How to Make Tallow Balm Video

Have you tried tallow balm?

How has tallow balm helped you? Have you ever made it yourself? Which essential oils do you think you’ll try?

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Learn how to easily render tallow with a crock pot

How to Render Tallow with the Easy Crockpot Method

More things you can make with tallow

How to Make Tallow Soap | Recipe & DIY Tutorial

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Yield: 8 fl. oz.

Bumblebee Apothecary Tallow Balm

How to make tallow balm Bumblebee Apothecary whipped tallow balm buy tallow balm

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Grass fed tallow
  • 1/4 cup Olive oil
  • 48 drops Essential oils

Instructions

  1. Melt tallow over gentle heat until it is liquid.
  2. Remove tallow from heat. Add olive oil and stir to combine.
  3. Add essential oils and stir again.
  4. For solid tallow balm, pour balm into glass jar. Allow to harden in the refrigerator. When solid, let balm come to room temperature before using.
  5. For whipped tallow balm, pour liquid balm mixture into a large mixing bowl. Allow to solidify at room temperature. When solid, whip with a hand or stand mixer until light and fluffy. Store in glass jar.
  6. Store both forms of tallow balm at room temperature.

 

123 thoughts on “How to Make Tallow Balm | Ultimate Skin Healing Moisturizer”

  1. Hi! I tried making following your recipe and it’s almost perfect.. but I think I added a little too much oil. The consistency isn’t as spreadable/thick as I’d like it and it seems to sweat down a bit.. it’s still pretty hard but it def turns into an oily substance a little quicker than I’d like upon application.

    I have both essential oil and jojoba mixed in. If I were to re heat and breaks this back down to liquid and add extra melted tallow.. would that ruin the essential oil mixture because of reheating? Also would adding extra tallow with no oils help the problem I caused? Trying not to add beeswax.

    Reply
    • It sounds like you have softer tallow from trim fat. Yes! You can melt it down and add more tallow, and that should help! I would probably add a few more drops of essential oils again afterwards, just because the heat can make those dissipate.

      Reply
  2. Hello! I just made your lip balm and I’m looking to make this! Can I add non nano zinc oxide to this to make it more of a daily facial sunscreen and balm?

    Reply
  3. hello marisa, I have several questions but first I want to thank you for all the dedication in what you do, your help and contribution are valuable, I would like to sell these balms but I have some doubts, (sorry I’m using the translator) do the jars have to be sterilized? Or just wash them or not wash them? When the bottle is 2 ounces, do you weigh the amount of balsam that goes inside or only if the bottle is 2 ounces, is it sold as 2 ounces? After 6 months, what happens with the balm, does its smell change, does it give it fungus, does it change its color, what is supposed to happen after 6 months have passed? should i put a warning on the jars to try not to get it wet? What is a reasonable price to sell them by the ounce? sorry for so many questions, thank you

    Reply
    • Thank you! I use new, clean jars, and don’t sterilize them or anything beforehand. I measure these in liquid ounces, and just pour it in. After 6 months it’s always been fine, I’ve never had tallow go bad. I just put 6 – 12 months to have some sort of “expiration date” instead of nothing 🙂 I include in my directions to use clean, dry hands when using. Price will depend on your location and local market, and you’ll have to do some research on that.

      Reply
  4. Hi! I just made some of this whipped tallow butter from tallow I rendered last Fall, using your directions to render it.
    It’s really nice to have a natural product and I like the idea of utilizing what I once considered byproduct waste. Now I know better!

    I made a half batch, since I don’t know how long it will take me to use it up.
    My tallow is a bit soft, so I decided to use just half the amount of oil in the recipe. I added 1/2 ounce jojoba oil to 4 oz tallow. I’m glad I read the comments so I knew to freeze the tallow/oil after mixing them.

    After letting it come back to room temp, I whipped it and it’s a lovely consistency.
    I don’t have many essential oils but I came up with an unusual (to me, anyway) mix of rose EO and peppermint EO. The peppermint gives the rose a little fresh zing. I like it!

    Thank you so much for your videos and recipes! I am going to make tallow soap next.

    Reply
  5. Hello,
    I’m looking for a seller that makes a solid tallow balm for the face, preferably with a little beeswax, and grass fed butter. Since it’s getting warm where I live, even a suggested recipe? I used to buy tallow face products from a seller on Etsy but I had an absolutely horrible customer service experience with this person and I’d rather find a way to make something similar myself, or find someone else with a similar product. If you have any suggestions, I’d be so grateful

    Reply
  6. Hello. I’m looking to make a homemade product for my hair. I have long knee length thick frizzy hair. I’ve been just washing my hair with water and wanted to try more of a natural animal based hair product to ease the frizz after washing for styling. Would your tallow balm work for my hair? Would you have any suggestions if not?

    Reply
  7. Do you have a lotion bar recipe for lard…😬. I understand tallow is better with the wonderful vitamins and all the other extras. I have 7 1/2 quarts of lard in my freezer and I’d like to turn some into lotion bars. Can you substitute the tallow with lard?

    Reply
  8. I have been making the whipped tallow balm for so long now.It is amazing for my face.Recently I developed eczema (I am due for allergy testing soon) and was wondering if I could add some colloidal oatmeal to it, and if possible,how much should I add.
    Any ideas?
    Thank you.

    Reply
    • That’s an interesting idea! I haven’t tried adding anything like that yet, so I’m not sure. If you try it, let me know how it turns out!

      Reply
  9. Hi! How much does one batch make? Looking at getting some 1-2oz jars to keep this in and wondering how many I would need. Thank you for these great recipes!

    Reply
  10. Hi Marisa! Thanks so much for all of your wonderful and informative posts, especially about tallow. I have been loving using your whipped tallow balm. This is my second batch and I haven’t been as lucky with it. I think I made the mistake of putting it in the refrigerator and whipping it directly when it came out when it was pretty cold. It whipped up nicely only to deflate and become liquefied within minutes. I let it set back to room temperature and have attempted to whip it again (now for nearly an hour) but it is not turning to a thick whipped butter, but rather a consistency more like milk lotion. I’m not sure what I’m doing wrong. I’m using Wagyu Tallow and know that it renders at a lower temperature so maybe I don’t need to use the olive oil mixture or maybe I need to add beeswax? I’d appreciate any input and advice. Thanks so much in advance!

    Reply
    • I’m happy to help. Yes, for softer tallow, I don’t add any liquid oil at all. I would try that 🙂 If you want to save the first batch, you might try adding some melted beeswax to firm it up. Hope this helps!

      Reply
      • Thank you, Marisa! Sorry for the double posting. 🙂 I’ve actually remelted my balm just this morning and added Shea butter in the place of the olive oil I didn’t use before. Would love your insight on that if you have a moment. Here’s hoping it helps! I was thinking the beeswax may be hard to incorporate and leave hard pellets in the finished product as it’s a much higher melting point. Thanks again and huge congratulations on your new addition!

        Reply
        • I think adding shea butter is a great idea! I haven’t heard of that happening with beeswax; I think the key is to melt everything (tallow and beeswax) together and make sure they are well combined, and then let it solidify. Thank you so much 🙂

          Reply
  11. Hi! I’m actually using Wagyu Tallow. The first batch I made was such a lovely butter consistency. The second batch I used with olive oil and accidentally put it in the refrigerator to harden instead of leaving it to sit at room temperature. I whipped it straight out of the refrigerator and it made a lovely better only to deflate and liquefy within minutes. I’ve gotten it to room temperature again and have tried to beat it for nearly an hour although it is not turning back to butter – more like a lotion consistency. What have I done wrong? I know that Wagyu tallow has a lower melting point than other cattle so maybe I don’t need to use any olive oil at all? Thanks so much!! I love your posts and all of your recipes for Tallow!

    Reply
    • Thank you! I’m happy to help. Yes, for softer tallow, I don’t add any liquid oil at all. I would try that 🙂 If you want to save the first batch, you might try adding some melted beeswax to firm it up. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  12. Hi Marisa!

    Thanks for making such detailed videos! I made the tallow balm and I used jojoba oil and some EOs. In half my the jars I made there is a layer of liquid at the bottom. I saw you said in someone else’s comment that it just may be soft tallow and you don’t have to add any liquid oils. However I’d like to salvage the ones I made. Any ideas?

    Reply
  13. Hi Marisa

    Do you find this balm can leave skin greasy?

    I seen a recipe for whipped shae butter that used arrowroot powder do make it less greasy.

    Could the same be done with tallow balm?

    Reply
    • Great questions! I only find it that way if I use too much. A little goes a very long way 🙂 I also find that this absorbs into skin much nicer than plant based butters and oils. If you do accidentally use too much, I recommend wiping the excess off on a dry towel. I’ve never tried arrowroot powder, I just make sure to not use too much balm and it’s always worked great for us 🙂

      Reply
  14. Hello Marisa. Have you ever remelted the whip? I’m also struggling with the scent of mine being a little beefy and wanted to try adding more eo’s and trying again. It’s one of those things that I’m like- it should work but no harm in asking a pro!

    Reply
  15. Is it normal for a little bit of the liquid oil to rise to the top of the unwhipped balm after it solidifies? I tried making the tallow balm using some herb infused avocado oil instead of olive oil..just wanting to find out if this is normal or if I may need to adjust my oil ratios when using avocado oil instead of olive oil. I normally make the whipped balm but wanted to experiment with the unwhipped version. Thanks for any info!

    Reply
  16. I’ve made your balm a few times and shared it with family and friends with many acclaims. As many of us have many aches and pains, mostly from arthritis, I would like to make a batch with CBD oil. Would I have to reduce the amount of either one of the carrier oils (home rendered tallow and organic olive oil) or the essential oil by the amount of CBD that I want to add?
    Thanks

    Reply
    • I’m so glad! It depends on the consistency of tallow you’re using (harder or softer) but I think that in most cases, you could just add the CBD on top of the normal amounts of the other ingredients. Hope that helps!

      Reply
    • You might be able to use just tallow if you have soft tallow, but the nicest tallow (from the leaf fat) is too hard to use easily as a balm. It works better to mix in a little liquid oil to make it easy to spread and use 🙂

      Reply
  17. Hi, I have made your whipped tallow 2 times now and just love it!!!
    The first batch stayed nice and creamy until it was gone. The second got “gritty” after a few weeks. What did I do differently the second time??? I’ve been trying to figure it out with no success. Any ideas?

    Jan

    Reply
    • I’m happy to help! Softer tallow from trim fat will get the gritty texture if it cools slowly. Hard tallow (from leaf fat) stays smoother. To prevent the grittiness when using soft tallow, let the balm solidify quickly in the freezer, then let it come to room temperature before whipping. This will prevent the fat molecules from separating out and causing the gritty texture. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  18. This may be a dumb question but here goes… I’ve made this once and love it but was wondering when measuring 1 cup of tallow, is that melted or solid? does it matter? because i found it hard to accurately measure 1 cup of the hard stuff.
    Thanks for such and awesome website!

    Reply
  19. Hi. I’m using tallow for my skin for 2 weeks now my skin feels a bit dry, is that normal wil this change the longer I use the tallow oil cleansing method as well as the tallow balm and moisturiser?

    Reply
    • I’m happy to try and help! I’m guessing this is because of the skin adjusting to not needing to produce as much oil now. If you feel like your skin needs more moisture, you could try putting the tallow balm on twice a day instead of once a day (or more often than you already are). Hope that helps!

      Reply
  20. Hi! Curious if you find that your balm still has a beefy smell to it? I have grass fed/finished tallow that I’m using and I felt I smelled like hamburgers all day after applying! My skin felt amazing but not so sure what to do about the smell. I did use essential oils, perhaps not enough?? Thanks so much for any insight!!

    Reply
  21. Thank you for all of your valuable information! I make tallow balms and whips and I’m wondering if you have ever noticed the whipped consistency varying due to tallow being stored in the fridge before melting Cs not being refrigerated. I typically hear it on low in a double boiler, allow it to cool, add the carrier oil then leave it on counter overnight to form up into a balm like consistency then whip it up nicely. However I’ve found it only does this if the tallow was stored in the fridge first. And if it is mushy vs firm before I whip it, and try to harden it by then putting it in the fridge or freezer, it produces a softer whip that later turns grainy and causes major separation. Any tips on how to get that lovely thick whip everytime without later separation issues? I did my normal pre fridge method yesterday but it didn’t firm up like a balm. This stuff is so finicky!

    Reply
    • I’m happy to try and help! I have found that leaf fat (the hard, smooth fat from around the internal organs) requires more liquid oil for a nice smooth whipped consistency, but that the softer trim fat tends to turn grainy. It is the softer trim fat that can separate, too. I try to use the leaf fat when I can since it makes for much nicer results. One thing that does seem to help is to have tallow made from the softer trim fat solidify quickly in the freezer, and then bring it to room temp before whipping. This keeps the fat molecules from separating out (which happens when it cools slowly) and avoids the grainy texture. I hope that helps!

      Reply
  22. Can you substitute the olive oil for organic coconut oil? Also is there a way to but this in a pump container. I want to make some for my sons, so no glass jars for them or would you recommend the bars for them?

    Reply
    • Great question! The amber glass will help protect the ingredients some, but I’ve used both kinds of glass with good success. I just store the jars away from direct sunlight either way. Hope that helps!

      Reply
    • Thank you! For acne, I really like Plant Therapy’s Zit Zapper Synergy. Lavender or Frankincense are also wonderful. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  23. Hello I love your recipe. I wanted to know you have what is a good combination for acne when using essential oils. Would love your input. Thanks

    Reply
  24. Hi Marisa!
    I am very satisfied with all your recipes and how well you explain it! I just applied my self made tallow balm for the first time and I already see a new era in my life; never buying body creams anymore! But i have a question regarding purification method. I poured the final mixed product to cool in the refrigerator but realized now that on the bottom of the jars there is still a little bit of “ impurities” “gelatin”to see. What to do? Can or shall i melt it again and do the process of scraping the bottom? Is it ok to do it with the oil that I already added?
    ( Rose hip Oil+rose scent) Thankyou

    Reply
    • Thank you, and I’m happy to help! If you strain through cheesecloth after the purification step, you shouldn’t really see a layer of impurities. Yes, I would melt it down, strain it through cheesecloth, and let it solidify. Then scrape anything off of the bottom of the tallow, and then make it back into balm. You might lose a little scent from the heat of melting it, but you can always see how it smells and add more if you want. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  25. Hi! Sooo I used Hemp seed oil because that’s all I had but it won’t whip up. It’s more like a liquid lotion and definitely not as nourishing as other tallow balms I’ve tried. Is it because of the hemp oil vs olive oil? Any thoughts on how to make it better? TIA!

    Reply
    • I’m happy to help! Hemp seed oil should work fine. Some tallow is softer than others. I find that the trim fat makes softer tallow than the leaf fat or suet. It sounds like you have soft tallow. It often works best to use less liquid oil or even none at all when you have soft tallow. I’d recommend trying that.

      Reply
  26. First, thank you so much for putting your time into this blog. I have found it very helpful. My husband is an avid deer hunter so I have been rendering venison fat into tallow. I have made your 100% tallow soap (and LOVE it) and both versions of this body butter. I prefer the whipped body butter but it is very grainy. I can rub these tiny pieces of fat in but it takes a bit of effort. My questions are: Does your whipped body butter have tiny flecks of fat? Is it just the type of tallow I am using? Am I doing something wrong? Any insight or suggestions are appreciated. Thank you!!

    Reply
    • Thank you so much for the kind words! Yes, fat from certain areas on the animal (usually the trim fat) can have a grainy texture when it’s made into balm. I did discover a trick that prevents this, though: When you solidify the balm before whipping, make sure it solidifies very quickly by putting it in the freezer. That will help the fat molecules solidify quickly and not separate into the grainy texture. Hope that helps!

      Reply
      • Thanks for the tip to get the tallow to solidify quickly to prevent the grainy texture. I am still struggling with how to do this as the tallow next to the edge of the mixing solidifies much faster than the tallow in the middle of the mixing bowl. That area of the tallow gets so stiff or hard that it does not whip up nicely like the rest of the tallow and so I still have lumps that won’t incorporate into a nice whipped texture. Do you have a remedy for this? I purchased some camel tallow and it is probably more like beef tallow and so I am struggling to get a smooth, unlumpy face tallow. All help is much appreciated!

        Reply
        • I’m happy to help! I solidify my tallow quickly in the freezer, and I’m able to get a large mixing bowl smooth this way. I put it in the “quick chill” section of my deep freezer. If you’re not able to get your smooth, I would try cooling it in smaller, flat containers. This might let you get an even, fast chill. Hope that helps!

          Reply
    • Yes! Tallow from cattle fed grass and grain is still great. The best is from 100% grass fed, but if you can’t find that, the tallow you have will still work just fine.

      Reply
  27. I made your Tallow balm recipe my wife and I love it but it separated after sitting for a week or so seems like the olive oil settled to the bottom. Did I do something wrong or is it normal to separate? I followed you recipe to the tee. This last batch I used 2 cups of tallow to 1/4 cup of olive oil I am waiting to see how it turns out.
    Thanks love our website and YouTube videos.

    Reply
    • Thank you so much! I’m sorry to hear about the separation, I haven’t had that happen. It could be that you have very soft tallow that doesn’t need any olive oil added. You could try making a batch with no olive oil at all. I hope that helps!

      Reply
  28. Hello! I want to make this recipe but I was wondering if I can make it more like a lotion rather than a butter. If I add water and a preservative will that work? What would the recipe be for such? Thanks!

    Reply
  29. Hello,
    I used you recipe for whipped tallow balm and I used a frankincense & myrrh blend from revive oils. I also ordered the tallow your link sent me to, fat works. This tallow is yellow in color and has an awful smell. I have just made my first batch and it stinks like the tallow still. Will that ever go away? Is there a tallow that doesn’t have that smell?
    Thank you for the recipe!

    Reply
  30. I apologize, I meant to submit as a comment rather than a review, so I hate to be redundant but do you mind sharing your exact ingredients and amounts for baby eczema? My 4 month old has just developed eczema and I want to be cautious in how I’m making the balm for him.

    Also, when making a balm for adults, it says 48 drops of essential oils. Is that 48 drops total, or 48 drops of each? Thank you so much for sharing!

    Reply
  31. Although I’ve been making tallow face cream for years, I just recently came across your site. Thank you so much for all the information you share. Finding the perfect consistency for me has been the thing I struggle with the most. A year or so ago, my local supplier had lamb tallow and it whipped up perfectly with just essential oils added. (Lavender, frankincense, and copiaba are my favorite) Anyway, do you think that lamb tallow is as healthy as the beef? Thanks again for sharing your wisdom! I enjoy your site.

    Reply
    • Thank you so much! Yes, lamb tallow is wonderful. Grass fed lamb tallow has the same benefits as grass fed beef tallow. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  32. I want to try this. In trying to purchase tallow, the label (on one) says to keep refrigerated after opening and to use within 3 months. Their tallow is sold for culinary use and soap etc.

    What are the storage requirements?

    Reply
    • Great question! Properly rendered tallow is very shelf stable. Tallow balm made from properly rendered tallow should be good at room temp for a year or longer. The jar is probably labeled that way just to stay on the safe side, if that makes sense, especially since it is also for eating. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  33. I love this tallow balm!! Thank you! It’s soo helpful on my eczema! I have noticed that mine separates in the heat. Have you experienced this before? It still works wonders, but I am wondering if I’ve done something wrong, or if there is a way to prevent this. Thank you!

    Reply
    • I’m so glad it’s been helpful! If the temperature gets very warm, it could soften or start to melt. Tallow from different areas on the animal is harder or softer than others. Usually the trim fat is softer, and the leaf fat is quite hard. If it happens, just chill and rewhip. You can store it in the refrigerator while the weather is hot. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  34. Hi Marisa!
    Great recipe thank you for sharing!
    I’ve rendered the tallow but it still has a lingering aroma. Any tips on how to get rid it?

    Thanks!
    Natalie

    Reply
    • You can try doing another one or two purification steps and see if that helps. Some people also add baking soda to the water during the purification step, so that’s something you could try. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  35. Hi, I really would love to make the tallow cream but having difficulty to find the tallow in Germany, when I search amazon it brings up Collagen powder. I am not familiar at all with tallow… tia

    Reply
    • I’ve heard of that happening with the links if it is a different country. If you search for tallow, hopefully you can find it! I think Amazon works a little differently depending on what country you’re in. Let me know if I can help further!

      Reply
  36. I would love to make the cream,but my skin says no to olive oil.I plan on infusing some camellia oil with some herbs at 100 degrees fahrenheit for 72 h and use that instead. Do you think that would be ok.I also can not use any essential oils,as my face will turn red and crack so bad.
    Thank you.

    Reply
    • Yes, that sounds like a great solution. Any liquid oil that your skin likes will work fine. That’s perfectly fine to leave essential oils out, too. The camellia oil sounds like a wonderful idea.

      Reply
  37. Hi,

    Can you suggest a company that sells beef leaf tallow where I can render myself. I am not familiar with local butchers or ranches. I am in Southern Ca.
    Thank you,
    Kathy

    Reply
      • Hi Marisa, thank you so much for this wonderful content. How can you ensure the tallow is rendered properly? I bought a bag of tallow from a local butcher. I’m wondering if it will be self-stable if I follow your recipe. Also, would avocado oil work instead of olive oil? Thank you!

        Reply
        • If you follow these steps to render it, it should be rendered properly 🙂 It should be shelf stable for short term storage once it is rendered, as long as it has air flow around it. For long term storage, I recommend keeping it in the fridge or freezer. Yes, you can absolutely use avocado oil! Hope that helps 🙂

          Reply
  38. Just wanted to say thank you for all your hard work and fantastic posts!! I always look forward to your new posts; you’re helping me and my family live healthier lives! In particular, I’ll be eternally grateful that you’ve introduced me to tallow and given such clear instructions on how to work with it. You could’ve just linked to your Etsy shop and I never would have been brave enough to render my own/make my own balm, but you shared all the details instead! It just blows my mind what a good moisturizer it is. My previous attempts at natural moisturizers, with many ingredients, never came close. My disturbingly cracked heels are finally smooth after 5+ years! I’ve got acne-prone skin and I use this on my face with no issue. I’m like a crazed tallow convert- I’m passing out tallow balm to everyone I know, haha. It’s just such a relief to get rid of all my additional ingredients and just have something pure and simple that works for my whole family, especially my little ones. You rock!!

    Reply
    • This is such a sweet comment! Thank you so much, and thank you for being here! I love meeting fellow tallow fans 🙂 Isn’t it amazing stuff?

      Reply
  39. Can you do this without the olive oil? I know some of the essential oils can be used with out a carrier oil. How many drops would you put in with out the olive oil?

    Reply
    • Yes! You can use another liquid oil. Or you can leave the oil out altogether, but will be stiffer and not as easy to spread. The essential oil drops would be the same. It’s just a 1% dilution of essential oils 🙂

      Reply
  40. I love this whipped tallow balm! Just curious as to using this recipe on your face as I’ve only been using it as a body cream. Would you dilute it more (i.e. use less essential oils)? Any other changes to make it a face cream instead of a body cream? Thanks!

    Reply
    • I’m so glad! I like to use just a 1% dilution of essential oils, so that it is gentle enough for facial skin. I find that works well, but you could use even less if you want. Otherwise, it should be good to go! It is really amazing for your face 🙂

      Reply
    • Your information is amazing! thank you for sharing!
      Do you ever adapt your recipe in summer for the tallow whip, put in less oil? Mine does differ quite a bit winter to summer. Many thanks

      Reply
      • Thank you so much! Yes, I do find that I have to adjust the amount of oil depending on how hard the tallow is, due to those seasonal changes. If the tallow is harder, I add about 2-4 more tbsp of oil per cup of tallow to keep it a nice, soft consistency. Hope that helps!

        Reply
  41. I’m really excited to try this at some point however would an oil substitute like coconut, kukui, sweet almond ECT. work or do they not combine correctly? I have never worked with tallow before so I think more research before I attempt this amazingness!!

    Reply

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