Nourishing Traditions Chicken Bone Broth

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Bone broth is a staple in traditional cooking. The health benefits are amazing, and it is delicious! Today I’m going to show you how to make a Nourishing Traditions chicken bone broth. 

Nourishing Traditions chicken bone broth

Nourishing Traditions chicken bone broth

A good bone broth is the start to so many good soups, sauces, and more. It’s really easy to make, and I’m going to share with you the way I make a Nourishing Traditions chicken bone broth.

To be precise, there is a difference between chicken bone bone broth and chicken stock. I have a meat stock recipe here. I’ll be talking some more about the differences between the two a little later.

If you’re new to the Nourishing Traditions diet, I talk all about what it is in this post here

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This shares everything I need to know to make delicious chicken bone broth. It's really easy, too! #bonebroth #chickenbroth #nourishingtraditions #broth #stock

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Bone broth recipe

The method that I’m about to share makes chicken bone broth. I make it all the time, and I’ll be sharing my best tips on how to get it to turn out perfectly, every time. 

If you’ve put off trying to make chicken bone broth because you thought it was complicated or time consuming, I have good new for you! Bone broth is seriously one of the easiest things you’ll ever make. 

Ingredients for Nourishing Traditions bone broth

All you really need to make Nourishing Traditions chicken bone broth are chicken bones and water. That’s it! Of course, if you want to get fancy, you can add other things, like I often do, but it isn’t even necessary.

I normally like to roast a couple of organic, pasture raised chickens, and serve them along with some vegetable sides for a family dinner. Once we’re finished eating the meat off the bones, I save the bones and make broth with them.

Some optional ingredients for Nourishing Traditions chicken bone broth are:

  • Vegetables – Coarsely chopped onion, carrot, and celery can add nice flavor. Some people think the vegetables get too overcooked, impacting the flavor of the broth, but I like the flavor they impart. You can experiment and see what you like. 
  • Fresh parsley – I like to add this during the last 10 minutes of cooking.
  • Peppercorns – I like to toss in a generous teaspoon or so. 
  • Salt – You can also add this later once it’s finished, when you’re making soups or sauces with it, but I usually add it to the broth while I’m putting it together to cook.
  • White wine – I really like adding a generous splash of white wine. This adds great flavor, and it also helps to dissolve the collagen and connective tissues, giving the broth a silky texture. 
  • Apple cider vinegar – Some people say this helps pull minerals from the bones, and some people say it doesn’t actually do that. (source) I sometimes add it and sometimes I don’t. 

You’ll want to make sure you are using high quality water to make chicken bone broth. This is my Berkey water filter review for the water filter system we use in our home. 

How to make bone broth

Nourishing Traditions bone broth directions

Ingredients:

Optional Ingredients: 

Instructions:

  1. Place bones in a large pot or crockpot. 
  2. Cover bones with filtered water. 
  3. Add optional ingredients (except for parsley), if using. 
  4. If using a pan, bring to a boil, then immediately reduce to a low simmer. You want a gentle simmer, a very hot temperature with bubbles rising to the surface, but not a rolling surface. If using a crockpot, turn crockpot to low.
  5. Let simmer for 8-24 hours.
  6. During the last 10 minutes, add parsley if using.
  7. Strain broth and use immediately for drinking or meals, or store in glass jars in refrigerator. 

Bone broth how to make

That is basically all there is to making a delicious, Nourishing Traditions chicken bone broth. If you want the best results, there are some tips that are helpful to know when you’re making chicken bone broth. 

I’ll go over how to get clear broth, how to keep the flavor clean, and tips on storing broth.

Bone broth recipe

How to make clear chicken bone broth

To get clear broth, really watch the temperature while it’s cooking. Make sure to bring the broth to a boil at first, and then immediately reduce it to a simmer.

If you’re making broth on the stovetop, you’ll have more control and better results than if it is in a crockpot, but using the stove does take more careful watching to keep it at that perfect temperature.

A crockpot is more hands off, but does tend to keep the broth a bit hotter than is ideal. These days I do tend to go for the crockpot most of the time, just because I’m too busy chasing kids to baby sit a pot of bone broth. 🙂

Bone broth with clean flavor

Maintaining that gentle simmer will help keep the flavor of bone broth clean. Also, you can skim the foam off that rises to the top. 

If you’re not happy with how your bone broth is tasting, take a look at what other ingredients you’re adding. Are the vegetables getting overcooked and adding an off flavor? Try adding the vegetables later, so they’re not in the broth as long, or try making it with no vegetables. 

Bone broth benefits

What are the benefits of bone broth? Chicken bone broth is really a nutrient dense superfood. It is so soothing to the gut, and so healing. Bone broth is also a great source of protein. 

Remember how Grandma’s chicken soup was supposed to be the cure all for every illness? There is something to that! 

When soups and other dishes are made with homemade chicken bone broth, they are the best thing for anyone needing to recover from illness. And even if you’re not sick, chicken bone broth is a great way to get in lots of great nutrients, in a form your body can easily use. 

Bone broth nutrition 

Homemade Nourishing Traditions chicken bone broth is full of beneficial nutrients. Here are some of the nutrients in chicken bone broth:

  • Calcium
  • Magnesium
  • Potassium
  • Phosphorus
  • Zinc
  • Manganese
  • Selenium
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin K2
  • Glucosamine
  • Chondroitin
  • Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids

Benefits of bone broth

Bone broth for gut health

Nourishing Traditions chicken bone broth is one of the most important foods for healing the gut. Bone broth contains the “building blocks” that our body uses to heal leaky gut.

“Gelatin acts first and foremost as an aid to digestion and has been used successfully in the treatment of many intestinal disorders, including hyperacidity, colitis, and Crohn’s disease.” Nourishing Traditions, page 116

If you have problems with leaky gut, a bone broth diet, such as the GAPS diet, is something you’ll definitely want to look into. The whole purpose of the GAPS diet is to heal leaky gut. Since our gut is the basis for the rest of our health, healing leaky gut tends to resolve so many other health issues.

I have a GAPS chicken soup recipe here. If you’re curious about the GAPS diet, check out this post where I go over the GAPS explained diet in a nutshell.

You can add a probiotic boost to soup made with bone broth by adding some homemade sour cream. This sour cream yogurt recipe is perfect. While we’re talking about what to eat with broth and soup, this Nourishing Traditions sourdough bread is delicious along side.

Bone broth with chicken feet

Adding chicken feet to chicken bone broth is a wonderful way to really boost the collagen content of the finished broth. I usually add about 4 chicken feet per batch of chicken bone broth. 

If you buy chickens from a local farmer, be sure and ask for the feet! If your only option is a grocery store, ask for chicken feet at the meat counter of your local health food store. 

Bone broth vs. stock

Sometimes the terms “broth” and “stock” are thrown around loosely, but they do have specific meanings. What is the difference between bone broth and stock?

In general, meat stock is made by cooking meat on the bone in water. Meat stock is generally cooked for a much shorter time than bone broth. 

Bone broth is made by cooking bones in water, and it is usually cooked for much longer the meat stock. 

Meat stock is more gentle, and is a great choice when you’re starting the GAPS diet introduction phase stage 1. Bone broth, on the other hand, has more powerful therapeutic benefits. 

How often should you drink bone broth?

It’s ideal to have bone broth every day. You can have it in soups, make it into sauces, or drink mugs of it. 

Even if you don’t have it every day, making sure to eat or drink bone broth at least several times a week will do wonders for your health. 

Chicken bone broth

More Nourishing Recipes

Lemon mousse

Sourdough starter

How to render and purify tallow

GAPS chicken soup

Nutrient dense smoothies

How to make sour cream from raw milk

Have you made chicken bone broth before? 

What does your method look like? Share your thoughts in the comments!

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The recipe in this blog post is from the book, Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon Morrell. Learn more at nourishingtraditions.com. Nourishing Traditions® is a registered trademark of NewTrends Publishing. 

Yield: 3 quarts

Nourishing Traditions Chicken Bone Broth

Nourishing Traditions chicken bone broth

Bone broth is a staple in traditional cooking. The health benefits are amazing, and it is delicious! Today I'm going to show you how to make a Nourishing Traditions chicken bone broth. 

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 8 hours
Total Time 8 hours 10 minutes

Ingredients

  • Bones from 1-2 chicken carcasses
  • Filtered water

Optional Ingredients

  • Coarsely chopped vegetables, such as onion, carrot, and celery
  • Fresh parsley
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 tsp. peppercorns
  • Splash of white wine
  • Splash of apple cider vinegar
  • Chicken feet, heads, and necks

Instructions

  1. Place bones in a large pot or crockpot. 
  2. Cover bones with filtered water. 
  3. Add optional ingredients (except for parsley), if using. 
  4. If using a pan, bring to a boil, then immediately reduce to a low simmer. You want a gentle simmer, a very hot temperature with bubbles rising to the surface, but not a rolling surface. If using a crockpot, turn crockpot to low.
  5. Let simmer for 8-24 hours.
  6. During the last 10 minutes, add parsley if using.
  7. Strain broth and use immediately for drinking or meals, or store in glass jars in refrigerator. 

 

 

 

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